Tuesday, March 17, 2020

The framework to apply the effective WBDL Essay Example

The framework to apply the effective WBDL Essay Example The framework to apply the effective WBDL Essay The framework to apply the effective WBDL Essay Figure3:TheframeworktoapplytheeffectiveWBDLtotheorganizationsHumanResourceDevelopmentPlan.Table1highlightshowWBTsuchasWBDLanalyzesthelearningimperativesessentialfortheHumanResource.Thefirstlearningimperativeisthediversificationofthelearningportfolio.TheimperativeassertthatHumanResourceinvariousorganizationsmustmaintainthehighleveloftalentsoastomeetthepresentcompetitivechallenges(Tannenbaum,2002).Theexpandedlearningalternativesareessentialbecausetraditionalclassroomtrainingcanmeetalloftheorganizationsrequirements.ThelearningalternativesprovideindividualcustomizationandpersonalizedtrainingsoastoexaminethediverseissuesHumanResourceandorganizationsface.TheWBDListhevaluableflexibleadditiontotheorganizationslearningportfoliothatcanofferacustomizedtrainingexperiencesoastomeetthediverselearningrequirementsoftheemployees.Forinstance,theorganizationmayhavethecompleteportfoliooftheWBDLcourses.Theemployeesmaytakeandaccomplishthecoursethatmeetsaparticularlearningrequirement.Indevelopingthetrainin gstrategy,anAmericanRedCross(ARC)realizedemployeeshavevaryinglearningstylesandrequirements.Forinstance,theARChasvariousemployeeswhoareself-drivenlearnersreadytotakeasuitablelearningresourceandmakethemostoftheirlearningfromthemedia.TheAmericanRedCrossadoptedtheWBDLdesigntomeetthestrategiclearningrequirementswhilepermittinglearnerstoparticipateanddetermineintrainingcoursesthataresuitabletotheirrequirements.Theemployeescandownloadcareerassessmentandotherplanningtoolssoastheycanreadandunderstandthelearningandtrainingopportunitiesrequiredtomeettheorganizationalgoals(RogersBecker,2001).AcceleratingthepaceoflearningisanessentialbenefitderivedfromtheWBDL.Thepresentworkenvironmentneedsanacceleratedpaceofworkerlearning.Learningrequirementsoccurquicklyandoften(Tannenbaum,2002).TheWeb-BasedDistanceLearningapplicationcanbeappliedquicklyandfairly,andoncedeveloped,theapplicationcanreachworkersimmediately.TheflexibilityoftheWBDLcanassistHumanResourcemeettheirlearningrequirementsunderseeminglyimposs ibleissues.ProvisionoftheopportunitiestogrowandlearnisanotheressentialstrategyfortheHumanResource.Competitioncreatestherequirementtomaintainandattracttalentfromvariousworkers.Anessentialactionofcreatingcompetitionistomakecertainthatemployeesbelievetheyhavevariousopportunitiestogrowandlearncontinuously(Tannenbaum,2002).Thepartofofferingtheenvironmentsoastosupportcontinuouslearningandtrainingistomakecertainthatemployeesatalllevelsoftheorganizationcanactivelypursuedevelopmentandtrainingactivities(Noeetal.1997).TheWBDLcanofferaccesstolearningandtrainingopportunitiesalalltheworkersthatcanaccessthecomputerthatisconnectedtotheInternet.TheHumanResourcecanprovideworkersthatdonotperforminofficeswithsharedterminalstolearnandtrainviatheWebapplications.Table1:BenefitsofadoptingWBLsuchasWBDLinmeetingtheorganizationallearningrequirementsEffectiveWBTHumanResourcedesigningtheWBTarerequiredtoconsidertheleanertraitsthatrequirementsindevelopingtheWBTcoursesthatfacilitateandindividualizeratherthanhinder trainingandlearning.ByanalyzingtheHumanResourceapplications,someessentialguidelinesfortheeffectiveWBTdesignmaterialize.HumanResourceissuesintheWBTdevelopmentandimplementationisthefirstguidelinefortheeffectiveWBT.TherapidgrowthofthetechnologysuchastheWBDLindifferentworkplaceshascausedvariouschangesintheworkercommunication.Theimplementationoftheelectroniccommunicationreducesface-to-facecommunication.Also,theimplantationoftheelectroniccommunicationhasreducedtheoverallcommunicationinvariousorganizations.Thelossofthecasualinteractioncandoharmtoanorganizationbecauseinnovativeinformationisoftenasaresultoftheinteraction.Theface-to-facecommunicationisabsentintheWBT.TeoptionofthelearnercontrolisanotheruniqueaspectoftheWBTdesign.Asdiscussedearlier,traditionalclassroomtrainingbarelyofferscontrolfortheinstructor.TheWeblearnerscanmovefreelythroughtrainingandearnandeveninteractwiththeWebsitesoutsideofthelearningcoursethroughtheuseofthehypertext.CollaborativelearningisanothereffectivenessofWBTforth eHumanResource.TheabsenceofthehumaninteractionintheWBTcreatestheconcernwiththeeffectivenessoflearningandtraining.CollaborativelearningisusefulinbuildingtheHumanResourceknowledgeconcerningthelearningmaterials.LearnercontrolisanothereffectivenessoftheWBT,andthelearnercontrolcanbeobservedfromdifferentperspectives.Thelearnercontrolcanbeobservedthroughthesequenceoftraining,contenttheychoose,andthecoursetheyexploreduringthelearningprocess.WBTcanbeevaluatedthroughHumanResourcesatisfactioninperformingtheirskills.RecommendationsWBTshouldbetiedtoparticularbusinessobjectivessinceseveralexamplesoftheapplicationsdesignedtosolveparticularissuessuchasadmittanceofremoteemployeepopulations.Also,theHumanResourceshouldconsidertherequirementandtheopportunityforthecollaborativelearningwhendesigningWBT.HumanResourceshouldcautiouslyevaluatethedesignandleveloflearnercontrolwithintheWBT.Lastly,theHumanResourceshouldevaluatetheirWBTefforts,whetherthroughformativeevaluationortraditionalevaluationefforts.TheWB Tshouldbeanalyzedtoidentifyifitismeetingthegoalsspecifiedintheplanninglevelsofthetraining.ConclusionTheWBThasthecapabilitytohavethesignificantimpactonthefutureoflearning,training,anddevelopmentofskills.However,tomakecertainthatWBTistheworthwhileinvestmentfortheorganization,itisessentialtohavetheimplementationplanthatispurposelytiedtotheorganizationsbusinessapproach.Withcarefulevaluationandplanning,WBThasthecapabilitytosolvevariousHumanResourcechallengesindifferentorganizations.FortheeffectiveuseoftheWBT,HumanResourcemustunderstandhowtomakeuseoftheWBTinthetrainingoftheiremployees.ReferencesKhan,H. (2001).TheFrameworkfortheWeb-BasedLearning.Web-BasedTraining.EJ;EducationalTechnologyPublications.Ladd,B. (1990), TheEarlyCBTremembered:Howwegotherefromthere,InteractiveTechnologies,pp.8-10.Drucker,P. (2000), Thelongview,TrainingandDevelopment,Volume54No.12,pp.27.Berge,Z.L. (1998), TheConceptualFrameworksintheDistanceTrainingandEducation:DistanceTraining:HowInnovativeOrganizationsAreUsingTe chnologytoMaximizeLearningandMeetBusinessObjectives,Jossey-Bass,SanFrancisco.Galagan,P. (2000), E-learningRevolution:TrainingandDevelopment,Volume54No.12.Kosarzycki,M.,Salas,E.,Firoe,S. Burke,C.S. (2002), EmergingThemesinDistanceLearningResearchandPractice:someFoodforThought,PresentedattheAnnualConferenceofSocietyforIndustrialandtheOrganizationalPsychology,Toronto.Tannenbaum,A. (2002), TheStrategicViewofOrganizationalTrainingandLearningCreatingorImplementingorManagingtheEffectiveTrainingandtheDevelopment,Jossey-Bass,SanFrancisco,CA,p.10-52.Rogers,N. Becker,S. (2001), FromTrainingEnhancementtoOrganizationalLearning:AMigrationofDistanceLearningatanAmericanRedCrossSustainingDistanceTraining:AnIntegratingLearningTechnologiesintotheFabricoftheEnterprise,Jossey-Bass,SanFrancisco,p.329-47.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Blood Promise Chapter Two

He grabbed her shoulder, jerking her to him. He was fast-they always were-but I was on my game tonight. A swift kick knocked him into a neighboring building’s wall and freed Sydney from his grasp. He grunted on impact and slumped to the ground, stunned and surprised. It wasn’t easy to get the drop on a Strigoi, not with their lightning-fast reflexes. Abandoning Sydney, he focused his attention on me, red eyes angry and lips curled back to show his fangs. He sprang up from his fall with that preternatural speed and lunged for me. I dodged him and attempted a punch that he dodged in return. His next blow caught me on the arm, and I stumbled, just barely keeping my balance. My stake was still clutched in my right hand, but I needed an opening to hit his chest. A smart Strigoi would have angled himself in a way that ruined the line of sight to his heart. This guy was only doing a so-so job, and if I could stay alive long enough, I’d likely get an opening. Just then, Sydney came up and hit him on the back. It wasn’t a very strong blow, but it startled him. It was my opening. I sprinted as hard as I could, throwing my full weight at him. My stake pierced his heart as we slammed against the wall. It was as simple as that. The life-or undead life or whatever-faded away from him. He stopped moving. I jerked out my stake once I was certain he was dead and watched as his body crumpled to the ground. Just like with every Strigoi I’d killed lately, I had a momentary surreal feeling. What if this had been Dimitri? I tried to imagine Dimitri’s face on this Strigoi, tried to imagine him lying before me. My heart twisted in my chest. For a split second, the image was there. Then-gone. This was just some random Strigoi. I promptly shook the disorientation off and reminded myself that I had important things to worry about here. I had to check on Sydney. Even with a human, my protective nature couldn’t help but kick in. â€Å"Are you okay?† She nodded, looking shaken but otherwise unharmed. â€Å"Nice work,† she said. She sounded as though she were forcibly trying to sound confident. â€Å"I’ve never†¦ I’ve never actually seen one of them killed†¦Ã¢â‚¬  I couldn’t imagine how she would have, but then, I didn’t get how she knew about any of this stuff in the first place. She looked like she was in shock, so I took her arm and started to lead her away. â€Å"Come on, let’s get out to where there’s more people.† Strigoi lurking near the Nightingale wasn’t that crazy of an idea, the more I thought about it. What better place to stalk Moroi than at one of their hangouts? Though, hopefully, most guardians would have enough sense to keep their charges out of alleys like this. The suggestion of departure snapped Sydney out of her daze. â€Å"What?† she exclaimed. â€Å"You’re just going to leave him too?† I threw up my hands. â€Å"What do you expect me to do? I guess I can move him behind those trash cans and then let the sun incinerate him. That’s what I usually do.† â€Å"Right. And what if someone shows up to take out the trash? Or comes out of one of these back doors?† â€Å"Well, I can hardly drag him off. Or set him on fire. A vampire barbecue would kind of attract some attention, don’t you think?† Sydney shook her head in exasperation and walked over to the body. She made a face as she looked down at the Strigoi and reached into her large leather purse. From it, she produced a small vial. With a deft motion, she sprinkled the vial’s contents over the body and then quickly stepped back. Where the drops had hit his corpse, yellow smoke began to curl away. The smoke slowly moved outward, spreading horizontally rather than vertically until it cocooned the Strigoi entirely. Then it contracted and contracted until it was nothing but a fist-size ball. In a few seconds, the smoke drifted off entirely, leaving an innocuous pile of dust behind. â€Å"You’re welcome,† said Sydney flatly, still giving me a disapproving look. â€Å"What the hell was that?† I exclaimed. â€Å"My job. Can you please call me the next time this happens?† She started to turn away. â€Å"Wait! I can’t call you-I have no idea who you are.† She glanced back at me and brushed blond hair out of her face. â€Å"Really? You’re serious, aren’t you? I thought you were all taught about us when you graduated.† â€Å"Oh, well. Funny thing†¦ I kind of, uh, didn’t graduate.† Sydney’s eyes widened. â€Å"You took down one of those†¦ things†¦ but never graduated?† I shrugged, and she remained silent for several seconds. Finally, she sighed again and said, â€Å"I guess we need to talk.† Did we ever. Meeting her had to be the strangest thing that had happened to me since coming to Russia. I wanted to know why she thought I should have been in contact with her and how she’d dissolved that Strigoi corpse. And, as we returned to the busy streets and walked toward a cafe she liked, it occurred to me that if she knew about the Moroi world, there might be a chance she also knew where Dimitri’s village was. Dimitri. There he was again, popping back into my mind. I had no clue if he really would be lurking near his hometown, but I had nothing else to go on at this point. Again, that weird feeling came over me. My mind blurred Dimitri’s face with that of the Strigoi I’d just killed: pale skin, red ringed eyes†¦ No, I sternly told myself. Don’t focus on that yet. Don’t panic. Until I faced Dimitri the Strigoi, I would gain the most strength from remembering the Dimitri I loved, with his deep brown eyes, warm hands, fierce embrace†¦ â€Å"Are you okay†¦ um, whatever your name is?† Sydney was staring at me strangely, and I realized we’d come to a halt in front of a restaurant. I didn’t know what look I wore on my face, but it must have been enough to raise even her attention. Until now, my impression as we walked had been that she wanted to speak to me as little as possible. â€Å"Yeah, yeah, fine,† I said brusquely, putting on my guardian face. â€Å"And I’m Rose. Is this the place?† It was. The restaurant was bright and cheery, albeit a far cry from the Nightingale’s opulence. We slid into a black leather-by which I mean fake plastic leather-booth, and I was delighted to see the menu had both American and Russian food. The listings were translated into English, and I nearly drooled when I saw fried chicken. I was starving after not eating at the club, and the thought of deep-fried meat was luxurious after weeks of cabbage dishes and so-called McDonald’s. A waitress arrived, and Sydney ordered in fluent Russian, whereas I just pointed at the menu. Huh. Sydney was just full of surprises. Considering her harsh attitude, I expected her to interrogate me right away, but when the waitress left, Sydney remained quiet, simply playing with her napkin and avoiding eye contact. It was so strange. She was definitely uncomfortable around me. Even with the table between us, it was like she couldn’t get far enough away. Yet her earlier outrage hadn’t been faked, and she’d been adamant about me following whatever these rules of hers were. Well, she might have been playing coy, but I had no such hesitation about busting into uncomfortable topics. In fact, it was kind of my trademark. â€Å"So, are you ready to tell me who you are and what’s going on?† Sydney looked up. Now that we were in brighter light, I could see that her eyes were brown. I also noticed that she had an interesting tattoo on her lower left cheek. The ink looked like gold, something I’d never seen before. It was an elaborate design of flowers and leaves and was only really visible when she tilted her head certain ways so that the gold caught the light. â€Å"I told you,† she said. â€Å"I’m an Alchemist.† â€Å"And I told you, I don’t know what that is. Is it some Russian word?† It didn’t sound like one. A half-smile played on her lips. â€Å"No. I take it you’ve never heard of alchemy either?† I shook my head, and she propped her chin up with her hand, eyes staring down at the table again. She swallowed, like she was bracing herself, and then a rush of words came out. â€Å"Back in the Middle Ages, there were these people who were convinced that if they found the right formula or magic, they could turn lead into gold. Unsurprisingly, they couldn’t. This didn’t stop them from pursuing all sorts of other mystical and supernatural stuff, and eventually they did find something magical.† She frowned. â€Å"Vampires.† I thought back to my Moroi history classes. The Middle Ages were when our kind really started pulling away from humans, hiding out and keeping to ourselves. That was the time when vampires truly became myth as far as the rest of the world was concerned, and even Moroi were regarded as monsters worth hunting. Sydney verified my thoughts. â€Å"And that was when the Moroi began to stay away. They had their magic, but humans were starting to outnumber them. We still do.† That almost brought a smile to her face. Moroi sometimes had trouble conceiving, whereas humans seemed to have too easy a time. â€Å"And the Moroi made a deal with the Alchemists. If the Alchemists would help Moroi and dhampirs and their societies stay secret from humans, the Moroi would give us these.† She touched the golden tattoo. â€Å"What is that?† I asked. â€Å"I mean, aside from the obvious.† She gently stroked it with her fingertips and didn’t bother hiding the sarcasm when she spoke. â€Å"My guardian angel. It’s actually gold and†-she grimaced and dropped her hand-â€Å"Moroi blood, charmed with water and earth.† â€Å"What?† My voice came out too loud, and some people in the restaurant turned to look at me. Sydney continued speaking, her tone much lower and very bitter. â€Å"I’m not thrilled about it, but it’s our ? ®reward’ for helping you guys. The water and earth bind it to our skin and give us the same traits Moroi have well, a couple of them. I almost never get sick. I’ll live a long life.† â€Å"I guess that sounds good,† I said uncertainly. â€Å"Maybe for some. We don’t have a choice. This ? ®career’ is a family thing-it gets passed down. We all have to learn about Moroi and dhampirs. We work connections among humans that let us cover up for you since we can move around more freely. We’ve got tricks and techniques to get rid of Strigoi bodies-like that potion you saw. In return, though, we want to stay apart from you as much as we can-which is why most dhampirs aren’t told about us until they graduate. And Moroi hardly ever.† She abruptly stopped. I guessed the lesson was over. My head was reeling. I had never, never considered anything like this-wait. Had I? Most of my education had emphasized the physical aspects of being a guardian: watchfulness, combat, etc. Yet every so often I’d heard vague references to those out in the human world who would help hide Moroi or get them out of weird and dangerous situations. I’d never thought much about it or heard the term Alchemist. If I had stayed in school, maybe I would have. This probably wasn’t an idea I should have suggested, but my nature couldn’t help it. â€Å"Why keep the charm to yourselves? Why not share it with the human world?† â€Å"Because there’s an extra part to its power. It stops us from speaking about your kind in a way that would endanger or expose them.† A charm that bound them from speaking†¦ that sounded suspiciously like compulsion. All Moroi could use compulsion a little, and most could put some of their magic into objects to give them certain properties. Moroi magic had changed over the years, and compulsion was regarded as an immoral thing now. I was guessing this tattoo was an old, old spell that had come down through the centuries. I replayed the rest of what Sydney had said, more questions spinning in my head. â€Å"Why†¦ why do you want to stay away from us? I mean, not that I’m looking to become BFFs or anything†¦Ã¢â‚¬  â€Å"Because it’s our duty to God to protect the rest of humanity from evil creatures of the night.† Absentmindedly, her hand went to something at her neck. It was mostly covered by her jacket, but a parting of her collar briefly revealed a golden cross. My initial reaction to that was unease, seeing as I wasn’t very religious. In fact, I was never entirely comfortable around those who were hard-core believers. Thirty seconds later, the full impact of the rest of her words sank in. â€Å"Wait a minute,† I exclaimed indignantly. â€Å"Are you talking about all of us-dhampirs and Moroi? We’re all evil creatures of the night?† Her hands dropped from the cross, and she didn’t respond. â€Å"We’re not like Strigoi!† I snapped. Her face stayed bland. â€Å"Moroi drink blood. Dhampirs are the unnatural offspring of them and humans.† No one had ever called me unnatural before, except for the time I put ketchup on a taco. But seriously, we’d been out of salsa, so what else was I supposed to do? â€Å"Moroi and dhampirs are not evil,† I told Sydney. â€Å"Not like Strigoi.† â€Å"That’s true,† she conceded. â€Å"Strigoi are more evil.† â€Å"Hey, that’s not what I-â€Å" The food arrived just then, and the fried chicken was almost enough to distract me from the outrage of being compared to a Strigoi. Mostly all it did was delay me from responding immediately to her claims, and I bit into the golden crust and nearly melted then and there. Sydney had ordered a cheeseburger and fries and nibbled her food delicately. After taking down an entire chicken leg, I was finally able to resume the argument. â€Å"We’re not like Strigoi at all. Moroi don’t kill. You have no reason to be afraid of us.† Again, I wasn’t keen on cozying up to humans. None of my kind were, not with the way humans tended to be trigger-happy and ready to experiment on anything they didn’t understand. â€Å"Any human who learns about you will inevitably learn about Strigoi,† she said. She was playing with her fries but not actually eating them. â€Å"Knowing about Strigoi might enable humans to protect themselves, though.† Why the hell was I playing devil’s advocate here? She finished toying with a fry and dropped it back on her plate. â€Å"Perhaps. But there are a lot of people who would be tempted by the thought of immortality-even at the cost of serving Strigoi in exchange for being turned into a creature from hell. You’d be surprised at how a lot of humans respond when they learn about vampires. Immortality’s a big draw-despite the evil that goes with it. A lot of humans who learn about Strigoi will try to serve them, in the hopes of eventually being turned.† â€Å"That’s insane-† I stopped. Last year, we’d discovered evidence of humans helping Strigoi. Strigoi couldn’t touch silver stakes, but humans could, and some had used those stakes to shatter Moroi wards. Had those humans been promised immortality? â€Å"And so,† said Sydney, â€Å"that’s why it’s best if we just make sure no one knows about any of you. You’re out there-all of you-and there’s nothing to be done about it. You do your thing to get rid of Strigoi, and we’ll do ours and save the rest of my kind.† I chewed on a chicken wing and restrained myself from the implied meaning that she was saving her kind from people like me, too. In some ways, what she was saying made sense. It wasn’t possible that we could always move through the world invisibly, and yes, I could admit, it was necessary for someone to dispose of Strigoi bodies. Humans working with Moroi were an ideal choice. Such humans would be able to move around the world freely, particularly if they had the kinds of contacts and connections she kept implying. I froze mid-chew, remembering my earlier thoughts when I’d first come along with Sydney. I forced myself to swallow and then took a long drink of water. â€Å"Here’s a question. Do you have contacts all over Russia?† â€Å"Unfortunately,† she said. â€Å"When Alchemists turn eighteen, we’re sent on an internship to get firsthand experience in the trade and make all sorts of connections. I would have rather stayed in Utah.† That was almost crazier than everything else she’d told me, but I didn’t push it. â€Å"What kind of connections exactly?† She shrugged. â€Å"We track the movements of a lot of Moroi and dhampirs. We also know a lot of high-ranking government officials-among humans and Moroi. If there’s been a vampire sighting among humans, we can usually find someone important who can pay someone off or whatever†¦ It all gets swept under the rug.† Track the movements of a lot of Moroi and dhampirs. Jackpot. I leaned in close and lowered my voice. Everything seemed to hinge on this moment. â€Å"I’m looking for a village†¦ a village of dhampirs out in Siberia. I don’t know its name.† Dimitri had only ever mentioned its name once, and I’d forgotten. â€Å"It’s kind of near†¦ Om?† â€Å"Omsk,† she corrected. I straightened up. â€Å"Do you know it?† She didn’t answer right away, but her eyes betrayed her. â€Å"Maybe.† â€Å"You do!† I exclaimed. â€Å"You have to tell me where it is. I have to get there.† She made a face. â€Å"Are you going to be†¦ one of those?† So Alchemists knew about blood whores. No surprise. If Sydney and her associates knew everything else about the vampire world, they’d know this too. â€Å"No,† I said haughtily. â€Å"I just have to find someone.† â€Å"Who?† â€Å"Someone.† That almost made her smile. Her brown eyes were thoughtful as she munched on another fry. She’d only taken two bites out of her cheeseburger, and it was rapidly growing cold. I kind of wanted to eat it myself on principle. â€Å"I’ll be right back,† she said abruptly. She stood up and strode across to a quiet corner of the cafe. Producing a cell phone from that magic purse of hers, she turned her back to the room and made a call. I’d polished off my chicken by then and helped myself to some of her fries since it was looking less and less like she was going to do anything with them. As I ate, I pondered the possibilities before me, wondering if finding Dimitri’s town would really be this simple. And once I was there†¦ would it be simple then? Would he be there, living in the shadows and hunting prey? And when faced with him, could I really drive my stake into his heart? That unwanted image came to me again, Dimitri with red eyes and â€Å"Rose?† I blinked. I’d totally spaced out, and Sydney was back. She slid back into her spot across from me. â€Å"So, it looks like-† She paused and looked down. â€Å"Did you eat some of my fries?† I had no clue how she knew, seeing as it was such a huge stack. I’d barely made a dent. Figuring me stealing fries would count as further evidence of being an evil creature of the night, I said glibly, â€Å"No.† She frowned a moment, considering, and then said, â€Å"I do know where this town is. I’ve been there before.† I straightened up. Holy crap. This was actually going to happen, after all these weeks of searching. Sydney would tell me where this place was, and I could go and try to close this horrible chapter in my life. â€Å"Thank you, thank you so much-â€Å" She held up a hand to silence me, and I noticed then how miserable she looked. â€Å"But I’m not going to tell you where it is.† My mouth gaped. â€Å"What?† â€Å"I’m going to take you there myself.† Blood Promise Chapter Two He grabbed her shoulder, jerking her to him. He was fast-they always were-but I was on my game tonight. A swift kick knocked him into a neighboring building’s wall and freed Sydney from his grasp. He grunted on impact and slumped to the ground, stunned and surprised. It wasn’t easy to get the drop on a Strigoi, not with their lightning-fast reflexes. Abandoning Sydney, he focused his attention on me, red eyes angry and lips curled back to show his fangs. He sprang up from his fall with that preternatural speed and lunged for me. I dodged him and attempted a punch that he dodged in return. His next blow caught me on the arm, and I stumbled, just barely keeping my balance. My stake was still clutched in my right hand, but I needed an opening to hit his chest. A smart Strigoi would have angled himself in a way that ruined the line of sight to his heart. This guy was only doing a so-so job, and if I could stay alive long enough, I’d likely get an opening. Just then, Sydney came up and hit him on the back. It wasn’t a very strong blow, but it startled him. It was my opening. I sprinted as hard as I could, throwing my full weight at him. My stake pierced his heart as we slammed against the wall. It was as simple as that. The life-or undead life or whatever-faded away from him. He stopped moving. I jerked out my stake once I was certain he was dead and watched as his body crumpled to the ground. Just like with every Strigoi I’d killed lately, I had a momentary surreal feeling. What if this had been Dimitri? I tried to imagine Dimitri’s face on this Strigoi, tried to imagine him lying before me. My heart twisted in my chest. For a split second, the image was there. Then-gone. This was just some random Strigoi. I promptly shook the disorientation off and reminded myself that I had important things to worry about here. I had to check on Sydney. Even with a human, my protective nature couldn’t help but kick in. â€Å"Are you okay?† She nodded, looking shaken but otherwise unharmed. â€Å"Nice work,† she said. She sounded as though she were forcibly trying to sound confident. â€Å"I’ve never†¦ I’ve never actually seen one of them killed†¦Ã¢â‚¬  I couldn’t imagine how she would have, but then, I didn’t get how she knew about any of this stuff in the first place. She looked like she was in shock, so I took her arm and started to lead her away. â€Å"Come on, let’s get out to where there’s more people.† Strigoi lurking near the Nightingale wasn’t that crazy of an idea, the more I thought about it. What better place to stalk Moroi than at one of their hangouts? Though, hopefully, most guardians would have enough sense to keep their charges out of alleys like this. The suggestion of departure snapped Sydney out of her daze. â€Å"What?† she exclaimed. â€Å"You’re just going to leave him too?† I threw up my hands. â€Å"What do you expect me to do? I guess I can move him behind those trash cans and then let the sun incinerate him. That’s what I usually do.† â€Å"Right. And what if someone shows up to take out the trash? Or comes out of one of these back doors?† â€Å"Well, I can hardly drag him off. Or set him on fire. A vampire barbecue would kind of attract some attention, don’t you think?† Sydney shook her head in exasperation and walked over to the body. She made a face as she looked down at the Strigoi and reached into her large leather purse. From it, she produced a small vial. With a deft motion, she sprinkled the vial’s contents over the body and then quickly stepped back. Where the drops had hit his corpse, yellow smoke began to curl away. The smoke slowly moved outward, spreading horizontally rather than vertically until it cocooned the Strigoi entirely. Then it contracted and contracted until it was nothing but a fist-size ball. In a few seconds, the smoke drifted off entirely, leaving an innocuous pile of dust behind. â€Å"You’re welcome,† said Sydney flatly, still giving me a disapproving look. â€Å"What the hell was that?† I exclaimed. â€Å"My job. Can you please call me the next time this happens?† She started to turn away. â€Å"Wait! I can’t call you-I have no idea who you are.† She glanced back at me and brushed blond hair out of her face. â€Å"Really? You’re serious, aren’t you? I thought you were all taught about us when you graduated.† â€Å"Oh, well. Funny thing†¦ I kind of, uh, didn’t graduate.† Sydney’s eyes widened. â€Å"You took down one of those†¦ things†¦ but never graduated?† I shrugged, and she remained silent for several seconds. Finally, she sighed again and said, â€Å"I guess we need to talk.† Did we ever. Meeting her had to be the strangest thing that had happened to me since coming to Russia. I wanted to know why she thought I should have been in contact with her and how she’d dissolved that Strigoi corpse. And, as we returned to the busy streets and walked toward a cafe she liked, it occurred to me that if she knew about the Moroi world, there might be a chance she also knew where Dimitri’s village was. Dimitri. There he was again, popping back into my mind. I had no clue if he really would be lurking near his hometown, but I had nothing else to go on at this point. Again, that weird feeling came over me. My mind blurred Dimitri’s face with that of the Strigoi I’d just killed: pale skin, red ringed eyes†¦ No, I sternly told myself. Don’t focus on that yet. Don’t panic. Until I faced Dimitri the Strigoi, I would gain the most strength from remembering the Dimitri I loved, with his deep brown eyes, warm hands, fierce embrace†¦ â€Å"Are you okay†¦ um, whatever your name is?† Sydney was staring at me strangely, and I realized we’d come to a halt in front of a restaurant. I didn’t know what look I wore on my face, but it must have been enough to raise even her attention. Until now, my impression as we walked had been that she wanted to speak to me as little as possible. â€Å"Yeah, yeah, fine,† I said brusquely, putting on my guardian face. â€Å"And I’m Rose. Is this the place?† It was. The restaurant was bright and cheery, albeit a far cry from the Nightingale’s opulence. We slid into a black leather-by which I mean fake plastic leather-booth, and I was delighted to see the menu had both American and Russian food. The listings were translated into English, and I nearly drooled when I saw fried chicken. I was starving after not eating at the club, and the thought of deep-fried meat was luxurious after weeks of cabbage dishes and so-called McDonald’s. A waitress arrived, and Sydney ordered in fluent Russian, whereas I just pointed at the menu. Huh. Sydney was just full of surprises. Considering her harsh attitude, I expected her to interrogate me right away, but when the waitress left, Sydney remained quiet, simply playing with her napkin and avoiding eye contact. It was so strange. She was definitely uncomfortable around me. Even with the table between us, it was like she couldn’t get far enough away. Yet her earlier outrage hadn’t been faked, and she’d been adamant about me following whatever these rules of hers were. Well, she might have been playing coy, but I had no such hesitation about busting into uncomfortable topics. In fact, it was kind of my trademark. â€Å"So, are you ready to tell me who you are and what’s going on?† Sydney looked up. Now that we were in brighter light, I could see that her eyes were brown. I also noticed that she had an interesting tattoo on her lower left cheek. The ink looked like gold, something I’d never seen before. It was an elaborate design of flowers and leaves and was only really visible when she tilted her head certain ways so that the gold caught the light. â€Å"I told you,† she said. â€Å"I’m an Alchemist.† â€Å"And I told you, I don’t know what that is. Is it some Russian word?† It didn’t sound like one. A half-smile played on her lips. â€Å"No. I take it you’ve never heard of alchemy either?† I shook my head, and she propped her chin up with her hand, eyes staring down at the table again. She swallowed, like she was bracing herself, and then a rush of words came out. â€Å"Back in the Middle Ages, there were these people who were convinced that if they found the right formula or magic, they could turn lead into gold. Unsurprisingly, they couldn’t. This didn’t stop them from pursuing all sorts of other mystical and supernatural stuff, and eventually they did find something magical.† She frowned. â€Å"Vampires.† I thought back to my Moroi history classes. The Middle Ages were when our kind really started pulling away from humans, hiding out and keeping to ourselves. That was the time when vampires truly became myth as far as the rest of the world was concerned, and even Moroi were regarded as monsters worth hunting. Sydney verified my thoughts. â€Å"And that was when the Moroi began to stay away. They had their magic, but humans were starting to outnumber them. We still do.† That almost brought a smile to her face. Moroi sometimes had trouble conceiving, whereas humans seemed to have too easy a time. â€Å"And the Moroi made a deal with the Alchemists. If the Alchemists would help Moroi and dhampirs and their societies stay secret from humans, the Moroi would give us these.† She touched the golden tattoo. â€Å"What is that?† I asked. â€Å"I mean, aside from the obvious.† She gently stroked it with her fingertips and didn’t bother hiding the sarcasm when she spoke. â€Å"My guardian angel. It’s actually gold and†-she grimaced and dropped her hand-â€Å"Moroi blood, charmed with water and earth.† â€Å"What?† My voice came out too loud, and some people in the restaurant turned to look at me. Sydney continued speaking, her tone much lower and very bitter. â€Å"I’m not thrilled about it, but it’s our ? ®reward’ for helping you guys. The water and earth bind it to our skin and give us the same traits Moroi have well, a couple of them. I almost never get sick. I’ll live a long life.† â€Å"I guess that sounds good,† I said uncertainly. â€Å"Maybe for some. We don’t have a choice. This ? ®career’ is a family thing-it gets passed down. We all have to learn about Moroi and dhampirs. We work connections among humans that let us cover up for you since we can move around more freely. We’ve got tricks and techniques to get rid of Strigoi bodies-like that potion you saw. In return, though, we want to stay apart from you as much as we can-which is why most dhampirs aren’t told about us until they graduate. And Moroi hardly ever.† She abruptly stopped. I guessed the lesson was over. My head was reeling. I had never, never considered anything like this-wait. Had I? Most of my education had emphasized the physical aspects of being a guardian: watchfulness, combat, etc. Yet every so often I’d heard vague references to those out in the human world who would help hide Moroi or get them out of weird and dangerous situations. I’d never thought much about it or heard the term Alchemist. If I had stayed in school, maybe I would have. This probably wasn’t an idea I should have suggested, but my nature couldn’t help it. â€Å"Why keep the charm to yourselves? Why not share it with the human world?† â€Å"Because there’s an extra part to its power. It stops us from speaking about your kind in a way that would endanger or expose them.† A charm that bound them from speaking†¦ that sounded suspiciously like compulsion. All Moroi could use compulsion a little, and most could put some of their magic into objects to give them certain properties. Moroi magic had changed over the years, and compulsion was regarded as an immoral thing now. I was guessing this tattoo was an old, old spell that had come down through the centuries. I replayed the rest of what Sydney had said, more questions spinning in my head. â€Å"Why†¦ why do you want to stay away from us? I mean, not that I’m looking to become BFFs or anything†¦Ã¢â‚¬  â€Å"Because it’s our duty to God to protect the rest of humanity from evil creatures of the night.† Absentmindedly, her hand went to something at her neck. It was mostly covered by her jacket, but a parting of her collar briefly revealed a golden cross. My initial reaction to that was unease, seeing as I wasn’t very religious. In fact, I was never entirely comfortable around those who were hard-core believers. Thirty seconds later, the full impact of the rest of her words sank in. â€Å"Wait a minute,† I exclaimed indignantly. â€Å"Are you talking about all of us-dhampirs and Moroi? We’re all evil creatures of the night?† Her hands dropped from the cross, and she didn’t respond. â€Å"We’re not like Strigoi!† I snapped. Her face stayed bland. â€Å"Moroi drink blood. Dhampirs are the unnatural offspring of them and humans.† No one had ever called me unnatural before, except for the time I put ketchup on a taco. But seriously, we’d been out of salsa, so what else was I supposed to do? â€Å"Moroi and dhampirs are not evil,† I told Sydney. â€Å"Not like Strigoi.† â€Å"That’s true,† she conceded. â€Å"Strigoi are more evil.† â€Å"Hey, that’s not what I-â€Å" The food arrived just then, and the fried chicken was almost enough to distract me from the outrage of being compared to a Strigoi. Mostly all it did was delay me from responding immediately to her claims, and I bit into the golden crust and nearly melted then and there. Sydney had ordered a cheeseburger and fries and nibbled her food delicately. After taking down an entire chicken leg, I was finally able to resume the argument. â€Å"We’re not like Strigoi at all. Moroi don’t kill. You have no reason to be afraid of us.† Again, I wasn’t keen on cozying up to humans. None of my kind were, not with the way humans tended to be trigger-happy and ready to experiment on anything they didn’t understand. â€Å"Any human who learns about you will inevitably learn about Strigoi,† she said. She was playing with her fries but not actually eating them. â€Å"Knowing about Strigoi might enable humans to protect themselves, though.† Why the hell was I playing devil’s advocate here? She finished toying with a fry and dropped it back on her plate. â€Å"Perhaps. But there are a lot of people who would be tempted by the thought of immortality-even at the cost of serving Strigoi in exchange for being turned into a creature from hell. You’d be surprised at how a lot of humans respond when they learn about vampires. Immortality’s a big draw-despite the evil that goes with it. A lot of humans who learn about Strigoi will try to serve them, in the hopes of eventually being turned.† â€Å"That’s insane-† I stopped. Last year, we’d discovered evidence of humans helping Strigoi. Strigoi couldn’t touch silver stakes, but humans could, and some had used those stakes to shatter Moroi wards. Had those humans been promised immortality? â€Å"And so,† said Sydney, â€Å"that’s why it’s best if we just make sure no one knows about any of you. You’re out there-all of you-and there’s nothing to be done about it. You do your thing to get rid of Strigoi, and we’ll do ours and save the rest of my kind.† I chewed on a chicken wing and restrained myself from the implied meaning that she was saving her kind from people like me, too. In some ways, what she was saying made sense. It wasn’t possible that we could always move through the world invisibly, and yes, I could admit, it was necessary for someone to dispose of Strigoi bodies. Humans working with Moroi were an ideal choice. Such humans would be able to move around the world freely, particularly if they had the kinds of contacts and connections she kept implying. I froze mid-chew, remembering my earlier thoughts when I’d first come along with Sydney. I forced myself to swallow and then took a long drink of water. â€Å"Here’s a question. Do you have contacts all over Russia?† â€Å"Unfortunately,† she said. â€Å"When Alchemists turn eighteen, we’re sent on an internship to get firsthand experience in the trade and make all sorts of connections. I would have rather stayed in Utah.† That was almost crazier than everything else she’d told me, but I didn’t push it. â€Å"What kind of connections exactly?† She shrugged. â€Å"We track the movements of a lot of Moroi and dhampirs. We also know a lot of high-ranking government officials-among humans and Moroi. If there’s been a vampire sighting among humans, we can usually find someone important who can pay someone off or whatever†¦ It all gets swept under the rug.† Track the movements of a lot of Moroi and dhampirs. Jackpot. I leaned in close and lowered my voice. Everything seemed to hinge on this moment. â€Å"I’m looking for a village†¦ a village of dhampirs out in Siberia. I don’t know its name.† Dimitri had only ever mentioned its name once, and I’d forgotten. â€Å"It’s kind of near†¦ Om?† â€Å"Omsk,† she corrected. I straightened up. â€Å"Do you know it?† She didn’t answer right away, but her eyes betrayed her. â€Å"Maybe.† â€Å"You do!† I exclaimed. â€Å"You have to tell me where it is. I have to get there.† She made a face. â€Å"Are you going to be†¦ one of those?† So Alchemists knew about blood whores. No surprise. If Sydney and her associates knew everything else about the vampire world, they’d know this too. â€Å"No,† I said haughtily. â€Å"I just have to find someone.† â€Å"Who?† â€Å"Someone.† That almost made her smile. Her brown eyes were thoughtful as she munched on another fry. She’d only taken two bites out of her cheeseburger, and it was rapidly growing cold. I kind of wanted to eat it myself on principle. â€Å"I’ll be right back,† she said abruptly. She stood up and strode across to a quiet corner of the cafe. Producing a cell phone from that magic purse of hers, she turned her back to the room and made a call. I’d polished off my chicken by then and helped myself to some of her fries since it was looking less and less like she was going to do anything with them. As I ate, I pondered the possibilities before me, wondering if finding Dimitri’s town would really be this simple. And once I was there†¦ would it be simple then? Would he be there, living in the shadows and hunting prey? And when faced with him, could I really drive my stake into his heart? That unwanted image came to me again, Dimitri with red eyes and â€Å"Rose?† I blinked. I’d totally spaced out, and Sydney was back. She slid back into her spot across from me. â€Å"So, it looks like-† She paused and looked down. â€Å"Did you eat some of my fries?† I had no clue how she knew, seeing as it was such a huge stack. I’d barely made a dent. Figuring me stealing fries would count as further evidence of being an evil creature of the night, I said glibly, â€Å"No.† She frowned a moment, considering, and then said, â€Å"I do know where this town is. I’ve been there before.† I straightened up. Holy crap. This was actually going to happen, after all these weeks of searching. Sydney would tell me where this place was, and I could go and try to close this horrible chapter in my life. â€Å"Thank you, thank you so much-â€Å" She held up a hand to silence me, and I noticed then how miserable she looked. â€Å"But I’m not going to tell you where it is.† My mouth gaped. â€Å"What?† â€Å"I’m going to take you there myself.†

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Republic of China Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Republic of China - Essay Example What makes all of this even more amazing is how little the average westerner knows about the lives, economic, social, and political, of 1.6 billion people. Every now and again, we read in the news about how China offers a great vacation, we see a "Free Tibet" sticker on the back of a car, or we notice that our newest gadget or piece of clothing was made in China. If one reads the right newspapers, they might think that Communist China is on the verge of collapse and massive democratic reforms are just a few years away. Upon closer inspection, however, this is clearly not the case. This paper will argue that the prospects for massive democratic reforms in China are very poor. It will do this by arguing that there is very little internal economic or social impetus for political change and Chinese leaders are unlikely to be swayed by Western Nations into instituting democratic reforms. Despite the fact that the Communist Party in China will remain relatively stable into the foreseeable future, there are still many problems that the party needs to address if it is to maintain it's stronghold in China. One of the primary reasons why one may think that the Communist party is likely to become more democratic in the near future is the success of the economic reforms, which began in 1978. According to Tony Saich, the Chinese government did three very important things in 1978 which would allow for future the future growth of the economy and allow for greater interaction with the rest of the world. First, economic modernization was made central to all party work. Ideology and class struggle were down-played and policy-making became more pragmatic, summed up in the slogan 'practice is the sole criterion for testing truth' and corresponding policy line of 'correcting mistakes wherever they are discovered.' Second, despite the plenum's decision to forget about the past and concentrate on the future, the new 'practice' slogan was used both at the plenum and subsequently to reverse a whole series of previous political judgmentsThird, the plenum formed the source for a new policy direction that gradually increased the influence of market forces in the Chinese economy.4 Of course, the economic reforms were very complex and continue to evolve to this day, and include entry into the World Trade Organization. Whole books have been written about this single process, needless to say, the economic reforms have had a major impact. Author Andrew Walder writes that, China's post-Mao economic reforms have generated rapid and sustained economic growth, unprecedented rises in real income and living standards, and have transformed what was once one of the world's most insular economies into a major trading nation.5 In a speech to the Fourth International Investment Forum, Gregory Chow said Since economic reform started in China in 1978, there has been a remarkable growth in GDP, to the order of 9.5 percent per year on average. What accounts for this tremendous success To answer in one sentence, the Chinese government has adopted institutions and policies that enable the resourceful Chinese people and foreign friends to unleash their energy to develop the Chinese economy. The farmers became energetic and productive since the 1979. The township and village enterprises were the most dynamic element for growth in the 1980s and early 1990s. Many private and foreign

Saturday, February 1, 2020

An essay about one of the subject listed, please read

An about one of the subject listed, please read - Essay Example The growing clamor for U. S. intervention cites the massacre of unarmed civilians, including women and children. The Assad regime is sinking to new levels of authoritarian brutality, with its use of helicopter gunships and arbitrary arrests. But it is to be kept in mind that when aerial bombing is ruled out, because of the risk of high civilian casualties, what remains is the prospect of American boots on the ground. With the unresolved quagmire of Iraq and Afghanistan looming in the background, the call for U.S. action is premature to say the least. Using a practical frame of reference, we must admit that, unlike Libya, Syria is not rich in natural resources. The only justification for America to send its troops into the midst of an escalating civil war is the humanitarian obligation. From the World Wars to the Balkans, Americans have done their share in sacrificing their lives for the cause of world democracy and justice. America consistently shoulders the major burden of all NATO commitments. It is time that other countries accept responsibility in ensuring peace. President Obama is correct in his stand to let the U.N. explore various other options in

Friday, January 24, 2020

Formal Recommendation To Purchase A New ATV Essay -- essays research p

Summary This report shows how the maintenance department can increase work efficiency. The improvements will result from purchasing a new ATV.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  This report focuses on the aspects of purchasing a new ATV to reach the maintenance department’s goal. The evaluating criteria include: rack capacity, towing capacity, ground clearance, fuel capacity, and cost. To improve the work efficiency of the maintenance department, the 2000 Yamaha Grizzly should be purchased. INTRODUCTION This report recommends the purchase of a new four wheel drive ATV. Using the internet for resources, the choice has been narrowed to two: 2000 Yamaha Grizzly and 2000 Honda Foreman ES.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Each ATV has been evaluated using the following criteria, in descending order of importance.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  ■  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Rack Capacity   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  ■  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Towing Capacity   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  ■  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ground Clearance   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  ■  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Fuel Capacity   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  ■  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Cost The current 1987 model ATV does not meet the new required standards for the maintenance department. The 1987 model ATV does not have a front cargo rack and the rear cargo rack has a maximum capacity of only 75 lbs. The towing capacity for the 1987 model ATV cannot exceed 500 lbs. Ground clearance for the current ATV is a mere 5 in. The fuel capacity for the current ATV is just 1.9 gal. Table 1 (shown below) shows the standard for each criteria. __________________________________________________________________________ Table 1. New Standard Criteria vs. Current ATV __________________________________________________________________________ Criteria Standard Current ATV Rack Capacity  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   75 lbs/150 lbs 0 lbs/75 lbs (front/rear) Towing Capacity 800 lbs 500 lbs Ground Clearance 7.5 in 6.5 in Fuel Capacity Largest 1.9 gal Cost Cheapest N/A __________________________________________________________________________ DISCUSSION In each of the following criteria sections the desired standard for the two ATV’s being compared will be stated. The information p... ...nbsp;  Ã‚  30 March 2000. â€Å"Grizzly Information.† Yamaha. 2 pages. Online. Dogpile. Available:   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  http://www.yamaha-motor.com/atv/grizzly/info.html. 30 March 2000 â€Å"Honda Fourtrax Foreman ES-Honda ATVs for 2000!† off-road. 4 pages. Online. Dogpile.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Available: http://www.off-road.com/atv/honda2000/TRX450ES.html. 30 March 2000. â€Å"Honda Motorcycles Models.† ATVS. 1 page. Online. Dogpile. Available:   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  http://www.atvs.com/models/print.html?category=atv&model_name=FourTrax_Foreman_ES.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  30 March 2000 â€Å"Honda Motorcycles: 300EX Engineering.† HondaMotorcycle. 1 page. Online. Dogpile. Available:   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  http://www.hondamotorcycle.com/models/atv/foreman_es/eng2.html. 30 March 2000 â€Å"2000 Grizzly Specifications.† Yamaha-motor. 2 pages. Online. Dogpile. Available:   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  http://www.yamaha-motor.com/atv/grizzly/specs.html. 30 March 2000

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Premchand’s Goodan and Dickens Hard Times Essay

There is always unremitting impression which brings Premchand’s Goodan and Dickens Hard Times in framework as an entirety. Goodan which was written 1936, in a nutshell travels on the apprehension of a life of a farmer, most importantly oppression in the hand of class structure. As a critic points out the life of Indian village and the farmer seems to be trapped in the net woven by the landlords, moneylenders and police i. e. suggesting double standard of the capitalists. Dickens correspondingly voices social injustice and problem in the capitalist framework most importantly oppression of the lower class by the upper class. A critic suggested that both the writers Premchand and Dickens primarily concerns to voicing the social reform, consciously trying to draw a balance between idealism and realism as a whole. In Hard Times which was written in 1854, depicted Victorian industrial society, and formulated a troop of radical critique of industrial England. Siengfried A.  Schulz in his book â€Å"Premchand : a western appraisal† provided mainly three proposition drawn between Hard times and Goodan. In Hard Times : 1) Injustice 2) Oppression of the poor by the upper class 3) Attack on the economic theorist, utilitarian. Again, in case of Goodan he proposes 1) deeply intrigued on the Question of Dharma. 2) Oppression of the poor by the rich. 3) Confinement of Premchand to depict the ugly aspect of Indian society. If we closely observe there seems to struggle between two world : world of fancy and world of factualism in Hard Times and world of village and city in Goodan. Goodan presents the life of Hori and his inclination towards religious ritual i. e. Goodan and his unable to forsake the concept of his dharma and his life is doomed due to his adherence to it. The use of the term Dharma by Premchand gives the impression of a hollow ring suggesting hypocritical too. Hori, hopes that all other would understand and naturally adhere to a traditional code of conduct, but his attitude is not reciprocated. This also gives a vibrant picture of problem of social hierarchy as a whole. In Hard Times too, the fact oriented ideology of the characters like Gradgrind and Bounderby can be seen as they opposed any kind of fancy or imagination. Dickens represents utilitarian concept of adherence to ‘fact’ which is dominant in the novel. Again, a critic points out that the marriage between Lusia- Bounderby can be connected with the character of Hori, as he too maries his elder daughter in marriage to an elderly man, but the difference according to him is that it is Hori’s helplessness and misery that drives him towards this decision. Some critic even points out that Premchand’s bringing out of this concept of marriage gives a parallel treatment of marriage as a whole for the western as well as Indian society. Through Hori, Premchand reveals the prospect of Indian farmers giving a warning that life of misery would continue until there is no change in the approach of Indian farmers towards his environment. Through Gradgrind and Bounderby, Dickens produced his product of representing the contemporary purely materialistic, scientifically bent utilitarian theory. A critic posts Goodan far ahead of Hard Times as it seems more realistic then Hard Times. There is many instances like the Gradgrind’s giving shelter to Sissy Jupe, and Hori’s giving shelter to Siliya which proposed Siegfried’s attempt of convincing that there can be possibility of borrowing ideas by Premchand Form Dickens. Again, there is also a possible analogy between lives of Stephen and Hori as both had extreme faith in life and simplicity and honesty are almost akin to Hori’s dharma. Even their death brings out similarity as both dies with desires that are not fulfilled. Stephen’s fall symbolizes the destruction of the working class by industrial upper class and Hori’s death indicates defeat of the Indian peasant in the face of unbearable odd. There can be similar parallel between characters like Stephen- Richel and Mehta and Malti in Goodan. Both limited roles, suggesting extra-marital affair. Through these characters Premchand represented the immergence of free thinking society. Mehta and Malti exposes Premchand’s idealism and Dickens depicted realistic form through Stephen and Richel. Premchand posesthe concept of westernization in the cities as well as Malti becomes the target of his sarcasm and satire too in Goodan. At last Tom and Gobar poises two portal of articulation as Tom suggests natural and nasty influence of the fact – oriented society. Gobar seems to be burdened by the approach of younger generation. Tom, like Gobar becomes the link betwwn the two worlds. Dickens seems to be hopeful but Premchand exposes his pessimism, his loss of faith in the ability of the Indian psyche to overcome change. This voices the two writers concern in reforming society. â€Å"No matter how far you’ve gone down the wrong road, turn back. † — Turkish Proverb

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Childhood During Early American Literature - 1447 Words

Brent Beebe Dr. Cari Keebaugh Lit-210-OL1 10/06/2017 Childhood in early American literature: In the early part of American history literature played a significant role in defining on how America would be shaped and molded. For the Puritans, coming to America provided the opportunity to express their opinions and beliefs. This opportunity was what they had been striving for and finally had the chance to implement. The Puritans took full advantage of this opportunity and utilized literature to provide values and rules to be followed. The literature written heavily influenced how people lived and made decisions as they went about their daily lives. Most importantly, the Puritans recognized that if they wanted to sustain what they had created†¦show more content†¦Children were constantly reminded of the impending doom that would overtake them if they did not listen to the rules or follow the Puritan beliefs. Literature was an instrumental tool used in teaching those beliefs and values to children. The texts children read provided a pathway and an understanding of what w as expected of them to their roles amongst society. The first texts written for Children and about Childhood were rigid and were more focused on religion. For example, In the New England Primer â€Å"Verses for Little Children† the value of loyalty is taught. More specifically is that absolute loyalty to God is required. â€Å"He gives me life, he gives me breath, And he can save my soul from death. By Jesus Christ, my only Lord, Aecordingr to his holy word† (New England Primer). The lesson being taught is that God controls your destiny and that one must remain faithful if one wants to remain in good standing with God. This lesson is further reinforced by the following passage â€Å"Though I am young, yet I may die, And hasten to eternity. There is dreadful fiery hell, Where wicked ones must dwell. 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